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're finished here. don't get up. i got it. you're busy. continue. you know what my team is doing right now? no. they're trying to figure out what's wrong with me. what's wrong with you? thanks for asking. they found out that i'm dying. that's sad. everyone's dying. that's sad. meteor lands on my head tomorrow, it's all academic. i told them to leave me alone, but did they? d-did they? no, that one was rhetorical. oh. no, they did not. what the hell were you before you hit your head? hell is a bad word. so's ass and bitch. i could probably rattle off 50 much more complicated and disgusting ones, but then your dad would get pissed at me. do you like your life? what life? your life. playing the piano, going on tour. scoring girls left and right. i don't like girls. boys. whatever gets you off. i like the piano. what's wrong? dr. peter hayes? this is eric foreman at princeton plainsboro. you're doing a signal transduction inhibitor clinical trial. what kind of results have you been-- transduction inhibitors are a decade away. bye, pete! they've got another trial going on at duke. 15% extend their
of innovative for a rat. but i don't think it will get him laid. jimmy, good to see you. i want to ask what you make of the study. you are about to be a grand dad. your son, gavin -- well he is not having the baby, his wife s. i hate when they say the man is having the baby. >> have i no problem with that. >> you have no problem? >> the couple is having the baby. it is coming out of one of them, but for the next 90 years, the couple will be handling the baby's problems. >> realliment -- really. so they are having the baby. that's progressive of you. >> yes. >> do you have opinions on this study? >> to be quite frank, the study though potentially accurate smells of an abortion fart to me. i'm sorry and i might be bias with a grandchild on the way, but it smells of the freak-anomic stuff where they said abortion helped. this baby shouldn't have born. don't have a baby. don't bring a child into this evil world. that's really sort of the impetus for this sort of study. i am a man. you know what i am saying. >> this is going to be used to abort children. >> sort of. i mean, i feel like this generati
in my future, i don't want to go to work, i don't feel well, you're going to draw in more negativity, you're going to get bitter on life and sink down into depression and miss your purpose. it's not easy when things are coming against you. you've got to get up and find something to be grateful for. >> that's it for us tonight. it's been an extraordinary year. thank you for watching. >>> hello, everyone. i'm deborah feyerick in for don lemon. the stories you're talking about in just a moment. but first, let's get you up to speed on some of the day's headlines. >>> aurora, colorado, the scene of a deadly movie theater massacre last summer is dealing with a new tragedy tonight. a barricaded gunman and three other people are dead after an early morning stand-off. police say the gunman opened fire on officers after hours of negotiation. >> a s.w.a.t. team was called out. they set up. hostage negotiators tried to get the suspect to come outside. we made multiple attempts. had intermittent phone calls with the suspect throughout the morning. >> officers shot and killed the gunman and found
a book called "killing unicorns." i get the unicorn. they don't. by the way, how many people are fans or "red eye." [cheers] >> all right. this whole unicorn thing got out of hand. the reason why i was talking about unicorns in the beginning of the show was i thought it would be odd and weird if a middle aged man would obsess with something a teenage girl would be, and i thought as a conservative, libertarian, it would be interesting to create like false narratives about you that would kind of throw off the left. if you assign certain kinds of behaviors to yourself, they don't know what to make of you. i learned this when i was at the huffington post, that i created this whole falls story behind me, that i lived with a flight instructor named scott. and he was never home. and there would always be some kind of weird stench in the basement, and i wrote this stuff because the left wasn't used to dealing with somebody who was messing with them. in the world of left and right, the right was always what i would call the dean wormer, from animal house. they delighted in that. my goal in lif
is what it could mean and insist we will get off the road to greece. >> i don't doubt that 72% want to see the spending cuts. which way do you think the public sentiment swings if there is a government shutdown? >> i think that pat toomey is confused. it's a continuing resolution. if they don't fund the continuing resolution, the government will shut down. if they don't lift the debt ceiling, the economy shuts down. not only the u.s. dme, maybe the world economy, and the consequences are drastic. bottom line on this, michael, and you know this, nobody should be threatening or rattling sabers, everyone, president obama, harry reid, everyone knows we need significant spending cuts. it's about time be act maturely, find out the spending cuts we need to make are done in the least onerous way. we also need to raise more revenue. the fiscal cliff raised 600 billion in revenue. we need to raise another $600 billion in revenue and need to find a way to dos that as well. >> do you agree with that sentiment? constantly hear from people who say the spending is out of control and if this is spun as re
government only bigger and getting much bigger and we don't seem to much care, do we? hi, everyone and happy weekend, i'm neil cavuto you want more vernment and well, you're going to have to put up more dough bause the deal transcending ended up only increasing spending. by now you know the score, it didn't cut a thing and let me cut to the chase. a lot more than just rich folks are going to have to c a check. lots of checks and lots of folks because taxing the rich ain't covering the bill. even with a billion dollar tax hike on the wealthy the next ten years, that wks out to about 60 billion bucks a year, barely enough to keep the government running for a week. and like i said, there not cutting anything and i mean anything. so, we have to find a way to keep feeding the beast. and just taxing the rich ain't going to satisfy even if you took their money, every last cent. ten years out our debt would be higher than it is now, you have to move down the food chain. you have to move down, well, to you, to the under 400 and under 450 grand crowd and i think way under. i'm thinking 50 grand and ov
this is great news for jobs, but with nearly 16 1/2 trillion dollars in debt someone here says if we don't start trimming the fat now, we're only killing more jobs later. so, who is right? hi, everyone, i'm brenda buttner, this is bulls and bears. let's get right to it, the bulls and bears this week, gary b smith, tobin smith. jonas max ferris and gary and caroline. welcome to everybody. gary k, the year is one week old and congress passing billions of new pork and you say bad sign for jobs in the new year. why is that? >> could have,look, it never ends. 430 million dollars for hollywood producers so they do movies in the u.s. versus other places? that's crazy. look, when you continue to raise spending it ends up being a tax on the economy, it keeps the headwinds on the economy, still at 7.8%, if you add in the people that came out of the work force we're more like at 11. it does nothing for nobody because gornment is inefficie inefficient, there is no profit motive and the inefficienes because of that does nothing for the economy going forward. >> brenda: jonas, doesn't it do something? might c
, renters, i don't care, it creates a change. we have a rule in this room that secondary conversations, please be kept to a minimum, if you don't mind. i am sorry to saying that, but i'm in the middle of the thought i want an answer and consideration and besides it's light. so i'm having a hard time that we're just brushing that aside saying property line windows, that is just too bad and we're opening the door for a huge amount of large apartment buildings, which are the signature and the mainstay of many of the buildings in that area, without really thinking about the consequences. in addition to that, i do not believe that adding one floor to an already large building without adding any units with the affect it has on everybody else is really any net gain by which i'm interested in not having a larger argument of why we're doing this? >> i wanted to respond to you about the notification for the conditional use. the project was correctly noticed to all property openers. regarding property line windows i take your point. the department's practice in reviewing cases like this is to,
was the least rotten apple they could have gotten. >> paul: a rancid deal and i don't like the spinach reference. how much damage is there to the economy from in bill? >> well, i prefer the least rotten apple than spinach. i think that the two big problems here, people who believe that the rich should pay more do not understand the effects of marginal rates. when you raise marginal rates-- >> the next dollar of income that you earn. >> right, it lowers the incentive of the people that you want it take risk and to innovate and to create. that's one problem. so it will affect the growth of the economy. the other problem is, it does affect tax revenues. the guys with the green eye shades say well if we raise the taxes this much, we'll get this much more revenue. if you lower the incentive of people to take risk, generally what happens, revenue does not come in. >> paul: you don't get as much as you think you'll do. >> exactly. >> here, mary, look, the economy seemed, the stock market loved it, the hs blew out the next day and up based on the prospect that something would get d
in journalism. sometimes they don't like to work together, but we tried to experiment. so far so good, as they say. >> host: why did it work for so long? >> guest: we think it worked because a similarity of work ethics. we both love to research and report. in effect, we both say that means we are of sound mind. nighter it means we like to -- nighter one likes to ride because that also means we are sound mind. similar work habits. i think a belief down deep of fairness in government and some case private interests and not always treat the average person fairly, and we sort of realize that early on in the partnership one way or another we have been writing about that ever since. >> host: donald barlett, the remember what your first project for the philadelphia enquirer was in 1971? >> guest: oh, yes. federal housing administration, fha. it was the fascinating project because it dragged on for two years. >> guest: they thought there were going to put this together for about three months, and we wrote some articles after three months, and it generated a tremendous response. what happened
sign it. >> citing things that this really don't want us to see. john: what if u are hiding things you don't want the government to see? >> whatever it is that what. >> the founder of with a pds. >> the internet and communication. that wld be good. john: the teacher does not have to be good. john: freedom to put up. >> will increase. john: that's our show. ♪ john: what keeps you safe? what prevents fraud? most people you asks a government. government must lay out the rules and punish fraud. protect people. so government regulates. over the years as more regulations and america we now have 170,000 pages of rules. people think we can't live without these, but then ame the internet. almost entirely unregulated, and it works. it is given us a new level of freedom. let's call it freedom -- "freedom 2.0". i could not have imagined it before coble, would compete. i assume the services like those could not work. what a joke. who would buy an unseen product from a total stranger without government regulation, it would make sure that the sellers are honest and a product for the. another joke.
generally that revenue doesn't come in. >> paul: so you don't get as much as you think. mary, the economy seems to be -- the stock market loved this. they blew out the next day and based on the prospect something would get done. how long go market is recovering. the economy and job market still not great, 155,000 new jobs, but the economy does seem to be doing okay. >> i think that is probably okay. the economy will do okay. but when you have an unemployment at 7.8% and really stubbornly not budging, you want to do something that something more for the economy than just okay, muddling through. if you are president you can say why you are feeling it but there are lot of people feeling the slow growth. it's disappointing we weren't able to do something has more of a positive impact. >> there were a couple big words attached. one was uncertainty, the economy needed certainty and the other was a prospect of a recession. i think the deal undoubtedly does avoid a recession. we're not going to have negative growth, but we are probably going to have growth as we have had for the last two years of
the feline felon before it could make its way inside. officials say they don't know who the intended recipient was and that all 250 inmates are suspects. pretty darn clirve. a feline felon. >>> cnn sunday morning continues at the opof ttop of the hour. >>> dr. sanjay gupta says what a father's helping a brain injury using fish oil. >>> hello and thanks for watching. the new year is here. a new chance to do things right. you know, i watched the doctor make this case that sugar is basically toxic. i want to talk about that today. he brings some new advice on what to eat. also, deepak chopra is here with tips how to distress and how to be happier. and how to keep a new year's resolution. here we go. ♪ >>> we're going to get to all of that, but first, every year, about 1.7 million people in the united states suffer a traumatic brain injury. sports, from falls, car accidents. i see it every day in my line of work. and in severe cases, i can tell you, there is no drug, there is no pill that offers any help. but i'm about to tell but two dramatic cases of crippling brain damage that may h
. cbc with platelets, chem panel, thyroid and adrenal function tests. for what? i don't know. (foreman) raise your left hand. that's your right hand. what are you looking for? just wanna make sure whatever happened doesn't happen again. push up. push up. he repeats what people say. it's a compensation mechanism. he knows he's supposed to say something, so he repeats what he just heard. that's good, shows he's engaged. spine's okay. all right. now stick out your tongue like this, copy me. you have a big tongue. [laughter] i know, it's funny, but copy me. [grunts] [soft grunt] there was construction on radcliff. so i had to get out of the car and, and walk in high heels for over a mile. radcliff? what was the cross street? does it matter? i don't know, i'm not the one who brought it up. tie this off. nice and tight. does this have anything to do with my foot? you have a blister. you don't waste a doctor's time with a blister. you waste a doctor's time with more important things. like the sewer that's being vented out of your mouth. my breath? if you could stop doing that, we'd all be gra
these matters resolved? look, the biggest problem confronting the country is not taxes, it's spending. we don't have this problem because we tax too little. we have it because we spend too much. we now have a $16.4 trillion national debt, as big as our economy. that alone makes us look a lot like greece. this administration has driven spending from 21% of our economy up to almost 25% of our economy. we've got to stop using the credit card, and any opportunity we have to engage the other side in a discussion about quitting the spending spree, we're going to engage in. >> and the question is, how do you follow through on your strategy, and, you know, a lot of your allies are worried about that prospect. "the wall street journal" editorial page said "the political result would be far worse if republicans start this fight only to cave in the end. you can't take a hostage you aren't prepared to shoot. do the two gop leaders have a better strategy today than they did in 2011?" and i guess you're hearing that phrase more and more now, shoot the hostage. are you prepared to do it, to see the country
was absolutely right saying this chapter here, i don't think anyone's going to understand it, and he also made wonderful suggestions, and so we took a chapter out and put it in after wards, what it was like to get out of diplomatic service and go to rutgers university where i've been ever since as a professor, and in the very late 60s, early 70s, i went there in 69, and i'm still there, and i was supposed to go to vietnam as a culture, and i thought it was a stupid idea, and i had three little children i was not going to abandon that i i thought was not a good war. there's two stories i want to focus on this evening. one is about the day i spent alone with martin luther king in madrid of all places, and the other one is about one of the really terrible events of the cold war which is when the united states ended up dropping four hydrogen bombs on spain. luckily, unarmed, and not on purpose, and i'll tell you that story later. two very different stories. the king's story is a soft story, and the bomb story is a hard story. before i do that, i thought i'd tell you about a few of the other chapte
this out. a lot of things are state base silly laws. but don't impact the economy . last year was an election year, we have a small number of regulations that are hitting us. >> you bring up an interesting point. emac, the's new list of regulations that are 77,000 pages was issued on the friday before christmas. trying to get buried in the holidays. >> it was released between april and october. these rules are going to cost the economy 128 billion . that is it one estimate out there. even russian czar said i don't rule russia. my miniczar's do. rich has it right. burrcrats are justifying and creating n rules . and i lk to them. they have to hire tir own burrcrat to dole with the government burrcrats. >> emac said you need new administrators and czars. >> maybe it would add jobs. but it is important to point out regulations are necessary. even governor romney said that . porly -- case in point. oregon is coming out with a law that makes employers not discriminate against unemployed applicants that is it important. we have seen discrimination there. that is good for the economy.
. >> what do you think emac? >> i don't li. buy it on weakness. it is too high right >> we are in a new year and not sure how people are going to be buying things. walmart is one of those stocks that always seems to do well. >> it was basically had a weak performance in the holiday shopping as all brick and mortar stores about. buy it on weaess. >> i think it is it a great choice. keep an eye on the earning's report. >> should we be concerned with the earnings or buy it now? >> buy on weakness . then they may pop. s for watching, have a great weekend. ♪ >> forget the rich. did this week's cliff deal throw poor people over the cliff. nonprofits think that folks will think twice about the charity. did the lawmakers punish the poor? i am cheryl casone, and welcome to cashin' n welcome to all of you. i want to start wutracey. did you think the deductions would hurt poor americans. >> i think everything that happened with the cliff would help lower income in particular. but contributions, cheryl,s threshold was lowered and that means more people are going to not going to deduct things on the sc
. there is a light well and i know there are pictures in your packet and i know we don't have a lot of time so we might not get to all of those. to the east of the property is another property with bedroom windows in the back. right here where my finger is the backyard of one of the neighbors on 46th avenue. if you look at the packet provided to you, the pictures taken by mr. ramblin, you will see that the views from those windows look straight where these decks are going to be. these decks are going to have glass railings. essentially you have people sitting on a deck, looking directly into the windows of their neighbors. bedroom neighbors windows of their neighbors and bathroom windows of their neighbors. this top facade shadows it. >> thank you. we may have further questions. >> okay, i hope you do, because we have waited a long time. and there is more that i have to say. >> your time is up, sir. >> speakers in favor of the dr? speakers in favor of the dr? >> good evening, i'm bill and i'm live on 47th avenue, which is around the corner. and my concerns are the loss of light, that the pr
their bikes in. alternatively, if owners don't want to allow their tenants to bring their bikes in, they are required by the environment code to provide bicycle parking space. our proposed ordinance allows such attorneys owners to comply with the code. any property that has not complied with environment code by august, 1 2013 deadline they will be out of compliance and if this ordinance is adopted they would have to comply with the updated bicycle parking requirements as defined in this ordinance. finally, the zoning administrator would also be able to modify, waive and provide variances for bicycle parking under certain circumstances. in cases where off-street car parking is not provided. overall, no variance would be given when automobile parking exists, or proposed in the building. this concludes my presentation. we are pleased to present this to you today. this ordinance would help the city to satisfy the increasing need for bicycle infrastructure. sufficient bike parking would help make biking a convenient choice for commuting. >> we have receive some support and comments fr
it's 2-foot 3-inches lower and you can see it not to include the roof and so i don't know if you can see it in the details here but the original shows the measurement of 39 feet 11-inches and the new one, showses a measurement of they have feet however the measurement of 37 feet is here. and so it's 37 feet 9-inch and is so it's only a 3 feet reduction and 9-inches matters and i'm frustrated that they told us 3 feet and their own plan shows that it's not and furthermore the top floor is increased in length and the superficial appearance of shrinkage and it looks like it got a little smaller and bring up -- let's see here we go i'll show the ordinary care first and then you new and so they pushed the building out further over the sidewalk and pushed it back ask so the top increased a little bit and the bottom increased by 6 feet really significant and they left it for me to discover and so after looking at this proposals that their treating ancompromise that i brog good f to them. >>> in which way did it increase towards the back or the personal property. >> the top story was i
bottles, even if you leave them in a cold environment, you don't know where they've come from or they've been in ship holds which is really hot, just as a number one rule, if you smell something plastic don't drink out of it. >> that's good advice. >> i have two questions, they're a little bit unrelated but the first one goes on the scheme of plastic, so plastic wrap, plastic bags, you know, it's great to say we should all use glass but we know what's used out there is plastic, and it's reusable, you can come up with all these ways to avoid it but there's plastic everywhere and it's accessible and cheap, so plastic wrap gets used a lot, there aren't that many alternatives that can do what plastic wrap does, i don't use a lot of it and it's harder to store things long-term and same question applies for the freezer, it's easier to put things in a freezer bag. >> so, a little tip for that is i do admit to using plastic bags, i reuse them and if something is not -- i don't use them for liquids and if something isn't somehow already kind of like a solid or whatever, parchment paper around
not little scratches and cuts. it looks like defensive wounds and i don't know how anybody could overlook that. as far as the idea that drawing dealers came to collect money from her. if you you remember on your show in the 1990s when i made the sensational claim that we had proof that whitney houston was being threatened by her drug dealer with death because she wasn't paying for her drugs that was before anybody knew that whitney was taking drugs. all this was borne out because whitney admitted she had been taking drugs since 1992. when she died her yearly intake of drugs was $230,000 and there were numerous cases not just that we claimed of h her being approached by drug dealers and threatened with physical harm and death and in one case bobby brown was kidnapped. there was a whole book written about this incident. he was kidnapped by a gang called the preacher gang and they tied him up naked, beat him, tortured him, pointed guns at his head and then had him call whitney and say you better bring $400,000 or we are going to kill your boyfriend. >> rod wheeler, former well known homicide
permission. we don't believe that is going to work because as we presented to you six months ago when you approved the eir, it does not appear to us or and i don't mean to put words in their mouths, but to the planning department in their recommendation on the eir, it does not appear to the planning department that it makes any economic sense or is feasible to reuse the structure there as any kind of residential housing. we tried to do it in 2004. we first spoke to senior housing developers in 2010. we spoke to senior housing developers again. and we are now talking to them again, but we don't see that as feasible. we're runing that course out as we can. the developer has done an unbelievable job of meeting with the community over the last six months. we have met with the community. i speak with members of community on a somewhat regular basis to talk and see if the developer is continuing to move forward. the reports that i get are that he is. we have a system in place now with regard to the building that if something occurs with regard to the building, members of community have the phon
or the life style as much as what they will do to create new jobs. but they won't because they don't know how much they will be asked to pay their fair share. tell me a percentage. fe will not do it. right now the average person will pay almost 44 percent of federal taxes and including state or local. how much is enough? gerri: here in new york city will local taxes and real estate it is almost that 60 percent. succession dollars going to3 government it is almost too much to take. talk about the do nothg congress. the debt ceiling and this week people are getting paychecks for the first time. >> people will be surprised the president said if you make less than $250,000 you will not pay one dime. they are paying a lot of times. making $50,000 will be on the hook of additional $1,600. you don't have that to give the government so they can waste it to borrow more money. it will hit people hard. ha and then add the obamacare tax and the economy will be in a world of hurt. gerri: maybe there is a tax revolution. people may make calls to congress. o knows? >> i do think there will be a revolt from
>> we're on that journey together, the journey through to death. and we don't know what's on the other side of that line of death. so we're locked in this embrace of the journey and the apprehension of what happens after we die. and it seems to suggest -- and i make this point in that show -- that we should help each other to make that journey easier and more meaningful. >> and we've got much more of william shatner and don lemon tomorrow night at 10:00 p.m. eastern. shatner talks about more of his life's philosophy, what it was like being broke, his fear, even today of losing it all again. that's tomorrow night at 10:00 p.m. from the cnn world headquarters in atlanta, we are so pleased that you joined us tonight. i'm deborah feyerick. we want to wish all of you a very good night >>> do you trust ahmadinejad. >> on this i don't. >> if the president didn't know exactly what happened, he sure as hell should have. >> candidates? >> i was the perfect candidate for america. >> what if mitt romney isn't the best person? >> the idea that somehow making a business profitable is
said, yes, i did, dad. hallelujah! don't let satan have your children. don't let satan have your children or any family member of your life. you have to get back to the horns of the altar and stand up. the body says the kingdom of god -- you have to get up in the faiths of satan and say -- you can't have my family! because as a promise that god has laid upon us that he's going to give us family heritage. but also, he's going to give us divine health. jesus took strikes upon his back so we could have family heritage and family health. number three, occupational blessing in verse 4. the fruit of the ground and cattle. in viable times, most of them raised cattle or sheep or agriculture. so having an occupational blessing was very, very important. today we don't necessarily, unless you're a farmer and live that way, there's a lot of different things we do. but the occupational blessing is upon us. ever you have to know god has a divine assignment on your life. whatever you're doing right now god has anointed you to do. it may not even be what you want to be doing. it may not be your
checks and guns carrying near schools or giving them to minors. we don't know what strengthened and stiffened penalties. t there are a lot of loose terms. >> tucker: we don't know anything, other than the mental component would have had an impact. it's hard to see to not see this as a power grab, none of these are related to what americans are upset about. if i give my 16-year-old a shotgun, they have to register, the burden falls on people who haven't committed a crime. >> clayton: you don't have to register the shotgun now. >> alisyn: you don't have to let authorities know. >> tucker: the federal authorities. in new york state perhaps you would, but most states you don't. >> alisyn: as we know the atf has a problem with that, tasked with regulating firearms, has a problem not significanting out which gun is going where, when people give them away, sell them. if it's stolen. atf one of the agencies that called for the national data base. obviously that's controversial. people don't want to be in a data base, they want to have-- >> this came up in the wake of the shootings in au
the book pretty readily. with publishers producing fewer books every year now, if they don't patronize stores like this or independent stores, they're going to find that there aren't going to be books around. there is already a decrease in the number of books that are available because of the-books, textbooks being put on line instead of being produced. so there will definitely be a decrease in the number of books available. if stores like this still survive there won't be books readily available for the public. as the book business continues to change, i would like to just be able to persevere and stay here for the indefinite future. >> for more information on book tv recent visit to providence, rhineland, and the miniature cities visited by our local content vehicles could to c-span.org / local content. >> next on book tv, henry gallagher recalls his assignment as officer in charge of the security detail for james maraniss, the first african-american admitted to the university of mississippi in september 1962. this is about 60 meant -- 40 minutes. >> thank you, ralph, john. my gratit
no matter where they live? that put a lot of pressure on them because the consumers said we don't want those things in our products and the change happened and now they have a plan with timelines and clear transparent goals to get those chemicals out of their products. it might be a little slower than we'd all like as consumers but it's moving in the right direction and getting one major company to move put a lot of pressure on those other companies if they want to maintain their credibility, so we're seeing safer shampoo products, we want to pass laws. >> radiation is the longest and best studied exposure link to breast cancer and what can we do about that, some radiation is naturally occurring, but we know that since 1980, radiation exposures for the average person have doubled and most of that is probably due to a 600 % increase in medical radiation, we're being exposed to a lot more radiation from medical tests, sometimes that's the only option, it's worth that added risk because the alternative is really dangerous sometimes, but we want to ensure those scans and those medical imaging te
around the world. >> ben? >> i love it . spiders. index fund. >> are they going to beat stocks. >> i don't thi they would. i like adams more than bens. ann forbes on fox. >> forget tax hikes in the new year. is the bigger worry the 77,000 pages of new regulations for making it illegal to own more than four cats and releasing wild hogs in the wild and using or serving single serve water bottles and regulations health care law. is it about to dry up the job market? hi, everybody. welcome to forbes on fox and go in focus with teave, rick and elizabeth and rich and morgan and victoria. now, rich. there are a lot of silly things and important rules and regs that are going to affect small business necessary america, right? >> you are right about that. you should look at financial regulations which makes it still hard for small businesses to get loans. health care regulations, obama care is it adding a cost burden evewhere you look behind ery nook and cranny. environmental regulations that is killing small businesses. california farmers are ruined in the protection of the certain in60s and labo
owners so it's hard for the city to do smart energy and policy if we don't know where we're starting from so we need to benchmark as a city and need property owners to know what their energy use and patterns are within their own property. the second one is to encourage local renewable energy and dg distributed generation and don't need to build new transition needs and local security and keep the dollars in the local economy and to help with us there are a number of recommendations and they're tinkering around the edge of our regulatory process and rules but ultimately we want to work together to drive comprehensive energy policy to support renewables and continue to take the lead on streamlining the processes and working with neighboring jurisdictions to do that as well so we have a standard system bay area wide and include this for local renewals and work with pg&e and we have a robust electric grid downtown and precludes installing renewable energy there and work with the homeowners so they know the options and how to finance it -- >> chair campos. >> commissioner mab. >> can i ask dan
to that? okay. why don't we open it up to public comment. >> good afternoon again commissioners. eric brook representing san francisco green party and the local organization our city. first a technical point on all of this. i was under the impression and check with dhr on this that the executive position still exists but filled on an interim basis. maybe i am wrong on that but good to make sure you're correct on that from the staff's perspective. i agree bringing it back in house because the next year is going to be really big for clean power sf and some other things and we need somebody that can be available five days a week, 50 weeks a year. i mean that's really going to be important, but the main thing i want to focus on is that the advocates for clean power sf have had some concerns with the way that lafco -- when we originally set set up lafco to work on clean power sf and especially get at the beginning of 2007 and what we needed from lafco and i believe the intention we needed somebody on task for clean power sf itself that could approach the sf puc on many occasions the sf
at that microphone right there. if you're coming up -- no, he did youant [speaker not understood]. >> i don't have a question. i wanted to comment on this. i think something else is really unique and maybe one of the untold stories or not told so much stories about the impact of open data is really the companies that are being formed. and as you mentioned earlier, they're a sustainable company and this is being powered by open data and motion loft is figuring out how they can share the asset that sort of your business model is built on. so, i think that this is presenting a whole new type of question for sort of apps built with government data or public data. >> i guess i'll jump in once here, too, while people are stepping up. we've been doing this for awhile now. one thing we've learned in this innovation space, people matter. like you can build technology you want, platform you want, that's great. it's the people who are doing it that matter and they're going to get stuff done. this has some of the best people, shannon and jay are doing t. they've been doing it awhile so they know what they're
don't. >> if the president didn't know exactly what happened, he sure as hell should have. >> candidates? >> i was the perfect candidate for america. >> what if mitt romney isn't the best person? >> the idea that somehow making a business profitable is different than helping people is really a foreign idea. >> and more. >> it's ridiculously easy for someone to purchase a gun. >> do you think homosexuality is a sin? >> i think that it's -- it's -- it's unnatural. >> did you wake up this morning and have a quick, you know? >> i probably did. probably did. >> "piers morgan tonight -- the news makers" starts now. >>> good evening. one of the great things about my job is that every night i get to sit down with movers and shakers. the men and women at the center of the biggest stories of the year. the world leaders, lawmakers, celebrities. and people who never expected to find themselves in the spotlight. what do they have in common? they're all utterly fascinating. tonight you'll hear from some of my favorite guests. we'll begin with the big man himself, chris christie. in the
. be a gracious host. don't keep that bean dip to yourself. president obama is still holding on to the coveted data base of 16 million voters, volunteers and donors. he's going to have to share if he wants to keep the party going. pick a theme. a togo party kegger. articulate goals with a clear, concise and memorable message that signals the vision for 2016 and beyond. now, here's a known secret that only the best party planners know, don't do it alone. delegate a few friends to pick up the ice or plates and cups. the president needs to identify his field lieutenants to do the grunt work of building up the party. that means running for office, searching for viable candidates to run in 2014 or 2016, buildsing party organizations and crafting a cohesive policy agenda on state and county levels. once you have done all of that, you want to make sure your party is unforgotable. don't be afraid to shake things up. swap out the regular lightbulbs for the black light and turn your party into a groovy shack. newt gingrich was good at this. inviting broad, diverse of people. make sure everyone doesn't a
this stuff that is the problem. what do you say to that? >> well, i don't think the idea -- the problem is that general petraeus had an affair. i think the idea and the big problem is that he was director of the cia and he walked right into one of the most blackmailable situations you can have. it's good the fbi found out about it before the russians and the chinese. that's the problem. it's not that he's a general messing around. even though according to the military code of justice, that's not allowed. the press is focused on the director of the cia having this problem. >>> teetering on the edge of the fiscal cliff. with 36 days to go until tax increases kick in, white house and congress are playing a high-stakes game of let's make a deal. >> grover, only you in america believes there has to be, what i believe to be really farcical now absolute pledge for life about these kinds of things. surely the nature of the modern world is very fast moving. it's changing a lot. america clearly has huge economic problems, heading for another fiscal cliff. everyone laughing at you from afar. the a
and probably senior democrat on the committee, so that, to me is part of the problem in the system and i don't to continue. >> why do you think they would be interested in putting the money there? let's look at it. i said the year of the flood comes every other year now, it seems. as congressman jeffries said new york and new jersey are donor states. if we got back what we gave to washington we wouldn't being have this discussion. we could take care of ourselves, but we don't. but the likelihood of places like mississippi, louisiana, florida and the gulf coast states will get a lot faster than we are and what's going to happen now is you're going to have members of congress from new york and new jersey and connecticut in the northeast states that may say, you know what? we're going to parcel out aid to you more slowly than you gave it to us. >> so this is what i learned this week in preparation for this. our flood policy is a total disaster? >> yes. >> and you've had this experience first hand. it's really important. it may sound remote to you, but listen to me, we'll have more floods so we
to lift that ceiling. the republicans don't. and it appears we're heading for another "thelma and louise" ride to the edge. remember -- they went over. we'll discuss that possibility next week with paul krugman, the nobel laureate in economics and "new york times" columnist whose bestselling book, "end this depression now!" calls for full employment as an alternative to austerity. read it, then send us the question you would like me to put to paul krugman. meanwhile, another reality beckons and there's a menace more threatening than the fiscal cliff ever was. what should really be scaring the daylights out of us -- the crisis which could make all the others irrelevant -- is global warming. get this one wrong and it's over -- not just for the usa, but for planet earth. that's the message delivered by hurricane sandy, and by almost all the extreme weather of the past two years. and here in the first month of the new year, it's the message from the most informed scientists in the world. they're scared, for real. and they say that unless we slow the release of global emissions from fossil fu
cliff and the outrage over a vote that didn't happen. >> disaster relief is something you don't play games with . now in the current atmosphere, everything is a subject of one upmanship and possibility of a fate for the political game and it is just why the american people hate congress. it is why they hate them. >> that was new jersey's governor chris christy one of the republicans that critized the fact that john bone bone's house of representative refused to hold a vote on a bill to spend 60 billion on hurricane relief. they approved a smaller chunk on friday. 9.7 billion and promising to hold more votes and this is how the media jumped on that. newark star ledger. christy rips gop on sandy bill delay. from the philadelphia inquirer. christy, shame on congress. cnn, called it a bomb shell. is that too much dralm ajim? >> well, i mean, it works for christydoesn't it? the governor of new jersey set himself up as a figure looking down with mostly scorn at the democrats and republicans in terms of the middle of the country that feels anti-congress . not all that keen on president obam
, and it sounds like a deadline that i don't want to see. what i'd rather see is a bipartisan approach starting soon, as soon as we return, between democrats, republicans and the house and the senate, talking about where we go, for example in, tax reform. there's money to be saved in tax reform. there's money to be saved in other areas. debbie stabna, head of the senate ag committee found a way to save $23 billion in spending we don't need in the farm program and reduce the deficit. why doesn't the house take that up and pass it. that's a good move towards deficit reduction. >> let me ask you about money to be saved in tax reform, because if the government saves money in tax reform, that means somebody's taxes go up. do you think that taxes have been raised enough on the wealthy? >> i can tell you that there are still deductions, credits, special treatments under the tax code which ought to be looked at very carefully. we forgo about $1.2 trillion a year in the tax code, money that otherwise would go to the government, and when you look closely, some of those things are near and dear to us indi
do not know the end of that yet. we don't know the results. if the fiscal cliff happens, whether it does or not, how will it affect jobs? >> it wouldn't be that critical either way. i think it will be a fiscal slope. i know politicians like to cry chicken little but in reality i don't think it will have a major impact. larger impacts will be obamacare. for example, one of the ways it will be somehow affordable is we're going to downgrade medical care. in instead of seeing a doctor you will see a physician assistant. that's where jobs will be. instead of seeing a physical therapist you will see a physical therapist assistant. >> what if somebody has been out of work for a while? therapy smart and willing to retrain. that takes time and money going out. >> the reality is most careers will require training. good news is the careers we were talking about are not like four years of medical school and four years of residency. a lot of the programs are one or two years. imaging tech jobs, being a medical imaging technologist or physical therapist assistance. >> if they have the needs, w
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